A startup will use underwater drones to find treasures 33 feet beneath the seabed

Archeologist, Dr. Robert H. Baer, who participated in the underwater drone’s testing, said, “Close examination of the silver plates and flintlock pistol strongly indicate that these artifacts may well serve as diagnostic artifacts that may lead to the identification of the Melbourne Beach shipwreck.”

While the SeaSearcher did not find gold or silver on its initial scan of the Ring Site, it did identify numerous materials including brass, iron, copper, aluminum, lead, and stainless steel.

Kennedy continued, “The SeaSearcher is based on AI machine learning algorithms; the more it’s used, the more its learning base grows. The more it learns, combined with known training sets, the more its abilities increase and the more it focuses our efforts towards high-precision, surgical archaeology. So, the process is working.”

A new design is on the way

The maker of the SeaSearcher, Seafarer Exploration, announced the construction of the second-generation SeaSearcher platform, which focuses on deeper water and multi-mode exploration.

A startup will use underwater drones to find treasures 33 feet beneath the seabed

SeaSearcher_V2

The upgraded design of the SeaSearcher has a wider path of metal discrimination and 3D imaging while looking more streamlined and rugged. The underwater drone is designed to operate both autonomously or could be towed behind a boat and can operate in high current areas.

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